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The New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has decision making power to stop this pipeline. They have very specific, legal criteria that gives them the power to deny Williams’ application, and we’ve made easy-to-access, online prompts that helps you write your letter. We will add a new subject every day for 8 days. If you join us after the 8 days, please feel free to send as many comments as you wish that pertain to your concerns about the pipeline that you would like to send to alert the DEC.

DAY ONE: Climate Change and Emissions Goals

Things you might discuss in your comment: The Williams NESE Pipeline would contribute to climate change, which will adversely affect area ecosystems. The pipeline would carry fracked gas, which is largely methane, a greenhouse gas 86 times more powerful in the short term than Co2…. READ MORE AND SEND COMMENT HERE

DAY TWO: PROTECT THE TURTLES

Under the Federal Water Quality Act, states have the right and the duty to protect the quality of their local waters. Under New York State law, it is the Department of Environmental Conservation that carries out this responsibility, providing “for the propagation, protection, and management of fish and other aquatic life and wildlife and the preservation of endangered species.”  Five species of sea turtle are found in the region where the pipeline would be built: Loggerhead, Green, Leatherback, Atlantic hawksbill, and (just recently), Kemp’s ridley sea turtle. All five of these species are listed as endangered or as threatened in New York and New Jersey, the states bordering the waters through which the pipeline would run… READ MORE AND SEND COMMENT HERE

DAY THREE: Destructive Construction Process for Pipeline Is a Significant Threat to Water Quality

Under the Federal Water Quality Act, states have the right and the duty to protect the quality of their local waters. Under New York State law, it is the Department of Environmental Conservation that carries out this responsibility.  The DEC must evaluate any project that might degrade the color, clarity, temperature, or odor of NYS waters, or that might introduce oils, chemicals, or other refuse… READ MORE AND SEND COMMENT HERE

DAY FOUR: Protect the Fish

Under the Federal Water Quality Act, states have the right and the duty to protect the quality of their local waters. Under New York State law, it is the Department of Environmental Conservation that carries out this responsibility, providing “for the propagation, protection, and management of fish and other aquatic life and wildlife and the preservation of endangered species.” READ MORE AND SEND A COMMENT

DAY FIVE: No Need for the NESE Pipeline

To date, no federal or state agency has undertaken a thorough, public examination of the need for the Williams NESE pipeline project…market data that Williams and National Grid  claim supports the need for this gas is kept from public view by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. FERC did no independent verification of need but merely accepted the existence of a contract between Williams and National Grid as proof that the gas is needed. READ MORE AND SEND A COMMENT

DAY SIX: Protect Shellfish and Horseshoe Crabs

Marine life that lives and feeds on the seafloor--clams, oysters and other mollusks, crabs and horseshoe crabs-- are particularly vulnerable to the disruptions that the construction of the Williams NESE pipeline would entail. READ MORE AND SEND A COMMENT

DAY SEVEN: Protect Marine Mammals

One of the positive effects of the cleaner water off New York City shores has been the recent return of seals and whales. The disruptions necessitated by a construction project of this magnitude will negatively affect seals and whales who return to the area.   The increased turbidity from excavating the 23-mile trench will make it difficult for these animals to find food and to navigate. READ MORE AND SEND A COMMENT

DAY EIGHT: Stop the Toxins

New York coastal water has improved significantly since their low point in the 1970s. Stricter environmental laws, investments in waste treatment, and the decline of industries on the rivers that flow into the region have led to a dramatic improvement in water quality.  All of the waters in which the pipeline construction would occur is the water quality that DEC is responsible for sustaining… READ MORE AND SEND A COMMENT